Amy Mahan Amy Mahan

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Amy Mahan focuses her practice on intellectual property matters in the life sciences, pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors. She works on a variety of patent infringement litigation cases involving monoclonal antibody biologics, cell-based immunotherapies and small molecule drugs. Read Amy Mahan's full bio.

Material Information Submitted to FDA but Withheld from PTO Gives Rise to Inequitable Conduct


By on Sep 16, 2021
Posted In Patents

The US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit found prior art submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), yet withheld from the US Patent & Trademark Office (PTO) during prosecution of an asserted patent, sufficient evidence for a finding of inequitable conduct. Belcher Pharmaceuticals, LLC v. Hospira, Inc., Case No. 20-1799 (Fed....

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Full Scope of Claimed Invention Must Be Enabled


By on May 20, 2021
Posted In Patents

In a case relating to nucleic acid sequencing, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit upheld a jury verdict of non-enablement because a skilled artisan would have only known how to successfully practice a narrow range of the full scope of the nucleic acids covered by the asserted claim at the time of...

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Set Phase to Subject Matter Ineligible: More Accurate Haplotype Phase Method Still Abstract


By on Apr 1, 2021
Posted In Patents

In an appeal from a final rejection of a pending application, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit held that claims directed to methods for determining “haplotype phase” were correctly rejected as subject matter ineligible. In Re: Board of Trustees of The Leland Stanford Junior University, Case No. 20-1288 (Fed. Cir. Mar. 11,...

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Method for Determining Haplotype Phase Found Subject Matter Ineligible


By on Mar 17, 2021
Posted In Patents

In an appeal from a final rejection of a pending application, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit held that claims directed to methods for determining “haplotype phase” were correctly rejected under 35 USC § 101 as subject matter ineligible. In Re Board of Trustees of The Leland Stanford Junior University, Case No....

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Doesn’t Scan: Skin Cancer Detection Device Just Combination of Familiar Elements


By on Feb 25, 2021
Posted In Patents

The US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned a finding of non-obviousness of certain claims relating to a device for the detection of skin cancer, finding that the Patent Trial & Appeal Board erred in applying the law of obviousness. Canfield Scientific, Inc. v. Melanoscan, LLC, Case No. 19-1927 (Fed. Cir. Feb. 18,...

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