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Paradise Lost: Art Created by AI Is Ineligible for Copyright Protection

The US Copyright Office Review Board (“Board”) rejected a request to register a computer-generated image of a landscape for copyright protection, explaining that a work must be created by a human being to obtain a copyright. Second Request for Reconsideration for Refusal to Register A Recent Entrance to Paradise (Copyright Review Board Feb. 14, 2022) (S. Perlmutter, Register of Copyrights; S. Wilson., Gen. Counsel; K. Isbell, Deputy Dir. of Policy).

In 2018, Steven Thaler filed an application to register a copyright in a work named “A Recent Entrance to Paradise.” Thaler listed as the author of the work the “Creative Machine,” a computer algorithm running on a machine. Thaler listed himself as a claimant and sought to register the work as a “work-for-hire” as the “owner” of the Creative Machine. The Board refused to register the work, finding that it lacked the necessary human authorship. Thaler requested reconsideration, arguing that the “human authorship requirement is unconstitutional and unsupported by either statute or case law.”

After reviewing the work a second time, the Board found that Thaler provided no evidence of sufficient creative input or intervention by a human author. The Board refused to abandon its longstanding interpretation of the Copyright Act, as well as Supreme Court and lower court precedent, that a work meets the requirements of copyright protection only if it is created by a human author. The Board concluded that “A Recent Entrance to Paradise” lacked the required human authorship and therefore affirmed refusal to register. Thaler filed for a second reconsideration.

The Board found that Thaler’s second request for consideration repeated the same arguments as his first request. Relying on the Compendium of US Copyright Office Practices (the Office’s practice manual), the Board found that Thaler provided neither evidence that the work was a product of human authorship nor any reason for the Board to depart from more than a century of copyright jurisprudence.

The Board explained that the Supreme Court of the United States, in interpreting the Copyright Act, has described a copyright as the exclusive right of a human and her own genius going back to 1884. The Board noted that the Supreme Court has repeatedly articulated the nexus between the human mind and creative expression as a prerequisite for copyright protection. The human authorship requirement is further supported by the lower courts. For example, in 1997 the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held in Urantia Found. v. Kristen Maaherra that a book containing words “‘authored’ by non-human spiritual beings” can only gain copyright protection if there is “human selection and arrangement of the revelations.”

The Board further explained that federal agencies have followed the courts. In the 1970s, the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works (CONTU) studied the creation of new works by machines. CONTU determined that the requirement of human authorship was sufficient to protect works created with the use of computers and that no amendment to copyright law was necessary. CONTU explained that “the eligibility of [...]

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Protecting Your Technology: IP Considerations in Digital Health

Digital health companies are producing innovative products at a rapidly accelerating pace and experiencing a boom in investments and demand as the regulatory environment becomes more supportive of digital health services to both improve patient care and stay profitable. Protecting intellectual property (IP) and building a feasible data strategy to support the research and development endeavor are essential steps for companies in their drive toward commercialization and return on their investment.

On this episode of the Of Digital Interest podcast, McDermott partners Bernadette Broccolo (Health) and Ahsan Shaikh (IP) explore key issues for digital health companies, their collaboration partners and investors, and start-ups to consider, including:

  • What is currently patent eligible in the digital health space?
  • What patent-eligible trends and opportunities are we seeing?
  • How do laws governing data sharing among digital health collaborators impact the research and development effort and associated IP rights?
  • What challenges and opportunities do artificial intelligence, blockchain and machine learning present for digital health innovators?

Listen now.




Key Takeaways from MWE International Seminar Intellectual Property Session – January 2020

On January 21 and 22, 2020, the 8th annual McDermott International Seminars took place in Osaka and Tokyo. These seminars focused on cross-border M&A, GDPR, intellectual property, global enforcement and other key topics. Lawyers from McDermott’s US and European offices, including Washington, DC; Chicago; New York; Paris; London; Brussels; and Munich, discussed these topics with Japanese companies operating globally. During the International Seminars, the Intellectual Property team discussed insights around emerging technologies and intellectual property.

What follows are key takeaways from the IP session of the seminar. (See highlights from the full Seminar.)

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