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IP Implications of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021

On December 27, 2020, Congress signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, into law. The omnibus act includes new legislation affecting patent, copyright and trademark law. A brief summary of key provisions is provided below. Patents – Section 325 Biological Product Patent Transparency 42 USC § 262(k) was amended to require that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provide the public with more information about patented biological products. Within six months, the FDA must make the following information available to the public on its Database of Licensed Biological Products or “Purple Book,” and it must update the list every 30 days: A list of each biological product, by nonproprietary name, for which a biologics license is in effect The license date and application number The license and marketing status (as available) Exclusivity periods The amendment requires that the holders of a license to market a biologic drug now disclose all patents...

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An Early Holiday Present for Generics? Legislation Requiring Greater Disclosure by Brands Passes the Senate

Earlier this month, two bills intended to promote generic competitiveness by presenting a clearer idea of the patent landscape covering reference products passed the full Senate, albeit with amendments. These laws, if enacted, will require brand pharmaceutical companies to submit more information about their innovator products. Potential Changes to Orange Book Listing Requirements for Non-Biologics Drugs As part of its current obligations, an innovator product manufacturer must submit to the FDA the patent number and expiration date of any patents that claim the drug or a method of using the drug. The FDA then performs the ministerial function of listing the information in the Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations, known as the Orange Book. The Hatch-Waxman Act permits generic manufacturers to file a counterclaim to delist a patent that they believe is improperly listed. Over the years, FDA has issued technical regulations expanding...

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Antitrust Liability Risk When Listing Patents in Orange Book

The US Court of Appeals for the First Circuit held that pharmaceutical companies that wrongly list patents in FDA’s Orange Book must prove they acted in good faith to avoid antitrust liability. In re Lantus Direct Purchaser Antitrust Litigation, Case No. 18-2086 (1st Cir. Feb. 13, 2020) (Kayatta, J). In applying for FDA approval to market new drugs, drug manufacturers must list all patents that “claim” the drug or the method of using the drug in FDA’s “Orange Book.” Listing a patent in the “Orange Book” allows the drug manufacture to trigger an automatic 30-month stay of FDA approval of any application for a competing drug product. Sanofi-Aventis first obtained FDA approval to market insulin glargine under the brand name “Lantus” in 2000, and filed a patent for the drug set to expire in 2014. In 2006, Sanofi filed a “supplemental” new drug application to sell insulin glargine in a disposable injector pen device called the “Lantus SoloSTAR,” and in 2013 listed...

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Inherent Claim Limitation Necessarily Present in the Prior Art Invalidates Patent

Addressing the issue of obviousness, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed the district court’s finding that a patent was invalid based on inherency because the claim limitation was necessarily present in the prior art. Hospira, Inc. v. Fresenius Kabi USA, LLC, Case Nos. 19-1329, -1367 (Fed. Cir. Jan. 9, 2020) (Lourie, J). The patent at-issue is directed to premixed pharmaceutical compositions of dexmedetomidine that do not require reconstitution or dilution prior to administration and remains stable and active after prolonged storage. Hospira makes and sells dexmedetomidine products, including a ready-to-use product called Precedex Premix covered by the patent at-issue. Fresenius filed an Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) seeking approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market a generic ready-to-use dexmedetomidine product. Hospira brought suit alleging infringement under the Hatch-Waxman Act. After a five-day bench...

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Inherency Can Be Used in Obviousness Analysis to Supply Missing Limitation

Finding that inherency can be used to show the presence of a missing claim limitation, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed a district court decision that asserted claims in pain management method patents were invalid as obvious. Persion Pharmaceuticals LLC v. Alvogen Malta Operations Ltd., Case No. 18-2361 (Fed. Cir., Dec. 27, 2019) (Reyna, J.). Persion has US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for its extended release hydrocodone product, Zohydro ER, and also owns two patents directed to methods of treating pain with extended release hydrocodone in patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment. Persion sued Alvogen for infringement of certain claims in these two patents after Alvogen filed an Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) requesting approval from the FDA to market a generic version of Zohydro ER. The asserted claims include: (i) non-adjustment claims directed to administering a dose of hydrocodone to patients with...

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