Federal Circuit: Contractual Arbitration Agreements Don’t Bind PTAB Institution Decisions

By on September 16, 2021
Posted In Patents

The US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued an order declining to intervene in inter partes review (IPR) institution decisions by the Patent Trial & Appeal Board (PTAB) and further denied a writ of mandamus to stay the PTAB’s IPR institution pending contractually required arbitration of the dispute between MaxPower and ROHM Japan. In re: MAXPOWER SEMICONDUCTOR, INC., Case No. 21-146 (Fed. Cir. Sept. 8, 2021) (Reyna, J.) (O’Malley, J., concurring in part and dissenting in part).

MaxPower owned patents directed to silicon transistor technology and licensed the patents to ROHM Japan. The license agreement contained an arbitration clause that applied to any disputes arising from or related to it—including patent validity. A dispute arose between the parties as to whether the patents covered certain silicon carbide transistor ROHM products. After MaxPower notified ROHM that it was initiating arbitration under the terms of their license agreement, ROHM challenged the validity of four MaxPower patents at the PTAB, which granted ROHM’s petitions to institute IPRs for the four challenged patents.

MaxPower appealed the PTAB’s institution decision to the Federal Circuit and sought a writ of mandamus to stay or terminate the IPR proceedings without prejudice to later institution if an arbitrator decided that IPR proceedings were appropriate.

The Federal Circuit held that the PTAB’s decision to institute IPR is non-appealable under 35 U.S.C. §314(d), which plainly “confirms the unavailability of jurisdiction” for the Court to hear direct appeals. The Court also found that MaxPower failed to meet the criteria necessary to invoke the collateral order doctrine, which allows appeals from interlocutory rulings if they decide an issue “separate from the merits of the case” that would not be reviewable after final judgment. The Court noted that MaxPower could still raise its arbitration-related challenges after the PTAB issued its final written decisions in these cases.

The Federal Circuit also rejected arguments that the appeals were authorized under 9 U.S.C. § 16(a)(1) and that MaxPower failed to show that its mandamus petition was not “merely a ‘means of avoiding the statutory prohibition on appellate review of agency institution decisions,’” citing the Court’s 2018 decision in In re Power Integrations.

Since the PTAB is not bound by private contracts enforcing arbitration agreements between parties, the Federal Circuit ruled that MaxPower had failed to show that the PTAB’s institution decisions in this case “clearly and indisputably exceeded its authority,” also stating that 35 U.S.C. § 294 does not authorize the PTAB to enforce private arbitration agreements.

In a partial dissent, Judge Kathleen O’Malley argued that the majority decision casts “a shadow over all agreements to arbitrate patent validity” and goes against strong federal policy in favor of enforcing arbitration agreements. While concurring with the majority that the PTAB’s IPR institution decisions are not appealable, Judge O’Malley stated that the case “provides exactly the sort of extraordinary circumstances under which mandamus review is appropriate” in what she called an important issue of first impression. The Supreme Court of the United States has held that “any doubts concerning the scope of arbitrable issues should be resolved in favor of arbitration,” but O’Malley argued that the PTAB “did the opposite” in this case and that federal policy favoring arbitration agreements should apply to the PTAB “just as it applies to federal courts.”

Judge O’Malley argued that by first requiring MaxPower to defend its patents at the PTAB, the majority ruling “denies MaxPower the benefit of any agreement to arbitrate validity,” adding that “if the Board finds that any of MaxPower’s claims are invalid, the harm to MaxPower is compounded,” whereas in the arbitration process, patent claims cannot be canceled.

Ralph E. Gaskins, MDRalph E. Gaskins, MD
Ralph E. Gaskins, MD focuses his practice on intellectual property and commercial litigation matters involving pharmaceuticals, medical and surgical devices, biotechnology, digital imaging, communications-enabled transportation systems, electronics and internet technologies. He also handles criminal and civil investigations under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act, and the Federal False Claims Act. Read Ralph Gaskins's full bio.

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